10 Dangerous Bridges Around The World

We have listed the 10 most dangerous bridges from around the world, Which are mainly built by communities live across the mountains or in the rural areas which are linked by only such bridges. They seem dangerous but some of these bridges are standing in this state for decades.

10. Ghasa – Nepal

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Home to the largest mountain in the world Mount Everest and the Western starting point of the Himalayas, Nepal is bound to have some interesting topography that requires bridges.Ghasa is located in Gus Village, and this flimsy structure is largely used to move cattle, and surprising little children are known to play on it.

 

9. Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge – the UK

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The bridge is located in Antrim Town, Northern Ireland and is 25m long at a height of 30m. A rope is there for support, but most tourists find it hard to cross the bridge.

 

8. Vine Footpaths AKA Bridges – Japan

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Japanese are known for their craft, but their ancient bridge designs are a little too daunting. These vine footpaths were made by warriors & traders in the old times to ease their travel and one of the most dangerous is situated over the Iya River.

 

7. Taman Negara National Park Bridge – Malaysia

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Malaysia is quickly becoming a world tourist hot spot, and one of the reasons is its natural scenery. This bridge is crossed by thousands of tourists every day. It covers an area of about 550 meters at the height of 40 meters and remains extremely wet due to rain.

 

6.  Kakum National Park Canopy Walkway – Ghana

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Situated deep into the Ghanain forest, this bridge is at a height of 76 feet and is only supported by a set of rocks on both sides. Additionally, the bridge needs renovation as the wood used in its construction is beginning to crumble.

 

5. Trift Bridge – Switzerland

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Fancy a trip across the infamous Swiss Alps? Then you better be ready to come across bridges like these. Situated in the Alps of Gadmen, it is 180 meters long and 110 meters high.  It was constructed in 2004 and renovated in 2009. The bridge has no side ropes for support & largely remains unsafe.

4. Musou Tsuribashi Bridge – Japan

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Constructed in 1950, this Japanese bridge has a poor design regarding safety as it barely does the job. The boards have too much gap between them and in some areas they are even broken, making this one of the hardest bridges to cross.

3. Marienbrucke – Germany

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Though this bridge might look solid in construction, it is difficult to cross. The bridge passes a large gorge and gives a chance to take stunning pictures but stays closed most of the year due to adverse weather conditions.

2. Aiguille du Midi – France

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This bridge is at an altitude of 12600 feet above the sea level and is supported by the two highest peaks of the French Alps. The bridge itself is daunting never mind the weather conditions that one might face. People are also advised that they should use sun screen to protect themselves from the sharp rays coming directly from the sun and the ones reflected by snow & ice.

1. Wooden Bridges- Gilgit-Baltistan PAKISTAN

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Some of the most dangerous bridges in the world are located in the North West of Pakistan. Nothern Pakistan is home to 3 mountain ranges The Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and the Himalayas, so not known to many, it has a lot of beautiful landscapes with lush green valleys & deep blue lakes.

Infrastructure is poor, and these bridges typify that, some of them are occasionally damaged by floods & high snow so are reconstructed almost each spring. Remarkably though, people are known to drive 4X4 Jeeps over these flimsy structures, prompting us to make them the most dangerous bridges on our list.

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