10 Haunted American Hotels

Want to stay in a vintage ocean liner that was transformed into a floating hotel where guests can room with with ghostly apparitions, or you want to stay in a Old West accommodation rumored to be haunted by a man they call “The Judge,” there are all sort of haunted hotels across America, we have collected such 10 hotels and featured them here for your haunting pleasures.

La Fonda On The Plaza, Santa Fe, New Mexico

La Fonda On The Plaza, Santa Fe, New Mexico

The grounds of the hotel La Fonda On The Plaza served as a hotel as early as 1607, the same year the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico itself was founded. At that time, the adobe structure that was there offered a place for travelers to find a quick respite, while the building also served as a courthouse and jail for some of New Mexico’s very first criminals.

Inevitably the inn at La Fonda On The Plaza was destroyed and rebuilt many times over the next few centuries. It became the stomping ground of many gamblers, criminals and hanging judges alike and also the home to several shootouts and even a suicide. The hotel boasts many stunning 1920s design elements, but many guests travel from miles around to spend the night in this notoriously haunted hotspot, where Judge John P. Slough, who was shot to death in the hotel’s lobby, tromps the halls noisily at night while the guests attempt to slumber.

Crescent Hotel In Eureka Springs, Arkansas

Crescent Hotel In Eureka Springs, Arkansas

The Crescent Hotel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas bills itself as “America’s Most Haunted Hotel” and offers tours each night that treat guests to the stories of its “many guests who checked out but have never left.” Among the ghostly guests that forever remain at the hotel are Michael, a worker who fell to his death while building the Crescent in 1885; the frisky specter of cat named Morris; and the wandering souls of the dead patients of a fake “doctor” who once fooled the desperately ill into staying at the hotel, to seek out his phony “cure” for their cancer. Even when occupancy at The Crescent is low, it seems the halls are fairly crowded with the many ghosts of guests who never, ever plan on checking out.

Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, Colorado

Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, Colorado

The Stanley Hotel was founded in 1909 when the West was truly wild—and among the ghosts that are rumored to inhabit the hotel are the hotel’s founders, Freelan Oscar Stanley and his wife Flora. It has been said that the musical strains of Flora’s old Steinway piano can be heard drifting through the hotel’s corridors in the evening; other guests have claimed to see F.O. Stanley’s visage appear in photographs that people have randomly taken within the hotel. But The Stanley Hotel has a more modern connection to the horror realm. After author Stephen King was a guest there in 1973, he was so inspired by the ghostliness of the old rooms and halls of The Stanley that he based his novel The Shining on the hotel.

Hotel Chelsea, New York City, New York

Hotel Chelsea, New York City, New York

The ghosts of the Hotel Chelsea are not just your average apparitions—they are of the famous variety. In the decades after the hotel first opened, many artists and bohemians took up long term residence at The Chelsea, among them Mark Twain, Tennessee Williams, and Janis Joplin. While the hotel no longer allows for guests to become permanent residents, the Chelsea, which was built in 1884, is a rumored to be home to several ghostly dwellers who seem unconcerned by this policy. Visitors to Hotel Chelsea have often mentioned witnessing the “bug-eyed head” of Dylan Thomas, who died at the hotel, drifting weightlessly down the halls along with other, equally frightening sights of the celebrities who once inhabited the building.

Queen Mary Hotel, Long Beach, California

Queen Mary Hotel, Long Beach, California

The Queen Mary was a luxury cruise ship like no other when she set sail in 1936. Over the next three decades she shifted from passenger liner to war time vessel back to ship of luxury again. Now she is permanently docked at Long Beach and is a floating hotel, attracting guests—and ghosts—from around the world. Besides wartime casualties, the Queen Mary has been the site of nearly 49 accidental deaths over the years and is considered one of the most haunted spots in all of the United States. Guests take day—and night—trips to witness the strange occurrences that have happened on board the hotel, including searching for the spirit of a girl named Jackie who drowned in one of the pools during the 1930s, and the sight of an elegant woman in an white evening gown who has been spotted dancing by herself in the shadows of the ballrooms.

The Biltmore, Coral Gables, Florida

The Biltmore, Coral Gables, Florida

While The Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, Florida was originally built in 1926 as a glamorous hotel, catering to the fashionable and the wealthy, during World War II the property transformed into a military hospital. The building was later abandoned and became a perfect spot for local teenagers and vagrants to break in and vandalize the halls. The hotel was eventually revamped and reopened to lodging guests in 1987 and since then, patrons frequently report sightings of paranormal occurrences on the property. Guests have stated that visions often vanish into thin air, and that they have noticed mysterious men in old fashioned uniforms wandering the halls, as though they are looking for something that can’t be found.

Bullock Hotel, Deadwood, South Dakota

Bullock Hotel, Deadwood, South Dakota

In 1896, Seth Bullock and Sol Star set out to build the finest hotel that the town of Deadwood, South Dakota could ever fathom to see. The Bullock Hotel was a smashing success in the town, but when proprietor Bullock died in 1919, rumors grew that his ghost remained on the property, continuing to run the hotel. In fact, even after the total renovation of the Bullock in the 1990s, visitors still often claimed to spot the original owner’s ghost on the premises, “playing host” and supervising the staff. The Bullock now even offers guided ghost tours for guests who want to dig deeper into the history of the hotel—and into the fascinating history of the entire town of Deadwood too.

The Copper Queen, Bisbee, Arizona

The Copper Queen, Bisbee, Arizona

Styled in one part Victorian luxury, one part rustic Old West saloon, The Copper Queen hotel in Bisbee, Arizona was built in the throes of the mining boom of the late 1890s. Guests come to The Copper Queen hoping to see ghosts and are often disappointed when a night’s stay in the hotel, which has even been featured on an episode of Ghost Hunters, does not produce any terrifying frights. The most famous apparition is that of prostitute Julia Lowell, who ran her business out of the rooms on the second and third floor of the hotel in the 1920s. Lowell reportedly fell madly in love with one of her clients, who rejected her advances. Devastated, the young woman took her own life. Those who have spotted Lowell’s ghost say she wanders the hotel at night, whispering in the ears of male guests and dancing alone near the bottom of the grand stairs.

Bourbon Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, Louisiana

Bourbon Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans is well known for its long history of voodoo and connection to the paranormal, and the Bourbon Orleans Hotel is perhaps one of the most notoriously haunted establishments in all of the French Quarter. Among the ghosts that have been spotted in the hotel are a confederate soldier who limps down the hall, the sound of his sword dragging on the floor, echoing across the walls. Other guests have claimed to see a woman dancing without a partner in the moonlight and employees of the hotel have mentioned cleaning a red spot on the carpet only to have it reappear in the same exact place the next day. Historians and believers of the paranormal claim that the spot is actually a bloodstain, at the site of a deadly duel between two wealthy Creole men several centuries ago.

The Logan Inn, New Hope, Pennsylvania

The Logan Inn, New Hope, Pennsylvania

The Logan Inn in New Hope, Pennsylvania dates back to 1727 and it has one of the most colorful histories of ghost sightings of all the hotels on the list. As many as eight different ghosts have been spotted in the scant 16 rooms of the Inn, but guests have been able to describe the sightings of these apparitions in surprising—and disturbingly—fine detail. Certain rooms of the tiny Inn, such as Room 6, are a veritable hotbed of paranormal activity. In Room 6, guests have frequently mentioned the sighting of two small children dressed in Colonial clothing, as well as the spirit of a woman that the owners refer to as Emily, whom they believe to be the ghost of the mother of the original owner of the Inn.

Loading...

Leave a Reply