Huge Ancient Forest World Found In China 630 Feet Down in Sinkhole

Huge Ancient Forest World Found In China

The sinkhole includes a load of ancient trees and plants that could well have some species that have never been uncovered before.

It is located in Leye County, in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China, the sinkhole was found by cave explorers on 6 May, who found three cave entrances inside the 1,004 feet long and 492 feet wide void.

Speaking to Live Science, expedition leader Chen Lixin said: “I wouldn’t be surprised to know that there are species found in these caves that have never been reported or described by science until now”. He added that some of the trees found in the forest were nearly 130 feet tall.

George Veni, the executive director of the National Cave and Karst Research Institute, told Live Science that differences in geology, climate, and other factors meant that karst – a terrain that’s dissolving bedrock can result in such sinkholes – can be dramatically different depending on where it is.

“In China, you have this incredibly visually spectacular karst with enormous sinkholes and giant cave entrances and so forth.

“In other parts of the world you walk out on the karst and you really don’t notice anything. Sinkholes might be quite subdued, only a meter or two in diameter.

“Cave entrances might be very small, so you have to squeeze your way into them.”

He was also unsurprised at the discovery, although there’s no doubt it looks jaw-dropping. According to the expert, because southern China is home to such vast karst topography, its landscape is prone to dramatic sinkholes and otherworldly caves. He explained that it’s slightly acidic rainwater that begins the process of dissolving the bedrock in a karst landscape.

He was not surprised at the discovery, although there’s no doubt it looks jaw-dropping. According to the expert, because southern China is home to such extensive karst topography, its landscape is prone to dramatic sinkholes and mystical caves. He explained that it’s slightly acidic rainwater that starts the process of dissolving the bedrock in a karst landscape.

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