The Teamwork Behind the First Ever Photo of a Mysterious Black Hole

Black Hole

In press conferences across the world, EHT (Event Horizon Telescope) researchers revealed the first visual evidence of a a huge black hole and its shadow.

The image shows the black hole at the center of Messier 87, a huge galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun.

black hole first real photo 6 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

Messier 87

black hole first real photo 4 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

Messier 87

 

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration that was designed to capture images of a black hole. The team comprises of more than 200 researchers around the world.

Creating the EHT was a formidable challenge which required upgrading and connecting a worldwide network of eight pre-existing telescopes deployed at a variety of challenging high-altitude sites. These locations included volcanoes in Hawai`i and Mexico, mountains in Arizona and the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, and Antarctica.

The EHT observations use a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) which synchronizes telescope facilities around the world and exploits the rotation of our planet to form one huge, Earth-size telescope observing at a wavelength of 1.3mm. VLBI allows the EHT to achieve an angular resolution of 20 micro-arcseconds — enough to read a newspaper in New York from a café in Paris.

 

black hole first real photo 9 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

black hole first real photo 10 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

black hole first real photo 11 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

 

The telescopes contributing to this result were ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter telescope, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano, the Submillimeter Array, the Submillimeter Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope. Petabytes of raw data from the telescopes were combined by highly specialised supercomputers hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory.

European facilities and funding played a crucial role in this worldwide effort, with the participation of advanced European telescopes and the support from the European Research Council — particularly a €14 million grant for the BlackHoleCam project. Support from ESO, IRAM and the Max Planck Society was also key. “This result builds on decades of European expertise in millimetre astronomy”, commented Karl Schuster, Director of IRAM and member of the EHT Board.

 

black hole first real photo 2 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

APEX

black hole first real photo 7 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

ALMA

 

The shadow of a black hole is the closest we can come to an image of the black hole itself, a completely dark object from which light cannot escape. The black hole’s boundary — the event horizon from which the EHT takes its name — is around 2.5 times smaller than the shadow it casts and measures just under 40 billion km across.

Supermassive black holes are relatively tiny astronomical objects — which has made them impossible to directly observe until now. As the size of a black hole’s event horizon is proportional to its mass, the more massive a black hole, the larger the shadow. Thanks to its enormous mass and relative proximity, M87’s black hole was predicted to be one of the largest viewable from Earth — making it a perfect target for the EHT.

 

black hole first real photo 8 The Incredible Teamwork Behind the First Ever Image of a Black Hole

 

The breakthrough was announced today in a series of six papers published in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The results help further confirm Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Before the picture was released to the public, the image — and the data used to create it — underwent a rigorous peer-review process, vetted by researchers in the field who were not part of the project.

The construction of the EHT and the observations announced today represent the culmination of decades of observational, technical, and theoretical work. This example of global teamwork required close collaboration by researchers from around the world. For more information visit ESO.org

Loading...

Leave a Reply